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Roman, Page 2

Palmyra – Colonnaded Streets
تدمر – شوارع معمدة

The ancient city of Palmyra (تدمر) had already been well established by the time the Romans seized control over the region, and the layout of the town was inconsistent with the Roman model of city planning. Various adaptations were made to incorporate imperial urban planning over subsequent centuries, and one of the main developments was the construction of colonnaded streets (شوارع معمدة) throughout the city. …

Palmyra – Camp of Diocletian
تدمر – معسكر ديوقلسيان

The area known as the Camp of Diocletian (معسكر ديوقلسيان) was a late Roman expansion to the ancient city Palmyra (تدمر), located at the western edge of the acropolis. The district was built to serve as a military outpost after Rome’s eastern frontier had become destabilized by Sasanian attacks from Persia and Zenobia’s revolt (267-271). It was under Emperor Diocletian’s rule, between 284 and 305, …

Palmyra – Agora & Tariff Court
تدمر – الآغورا و قاعة الضرائب

The ancient city of Palmyra (تدمر) features an impressive agora (الآغورا), or public gathering place. While these were traditionally the center of political and social life in ancient cities, in Palmyra (تدمر) it developed a major commercial role, similar to a caravanserai. It was here that trading caravans would unload and exchange their goods, transforming the complex into a central marketplace. The area was first …

Palmyra – Baths
تدمر – الحمامات

While poorly preserved, the baths (الحمامات) of Palmyra (تدمر) offer some insight into the public amenities of this ancient city during the late Roman period. In 273, prior to their construction, Emperor Aurelian’s troops had inflicted major destruction upon the city in response to a Palmyrene rebellion against Roman rule. During the subsequent reign of Diocletian (284-305), several building projects were undertaken as part of …

Palmyra – Museum
تدمر – متحف

The modern town of Palmyra (تدمر), northeast of the ancient city, was first settled in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Prior to that, around 6,000 villagers lived among the ancient ruins. French administrators encouraged the local inhabitants to resettle to the modern town, and most had done so by 1932. The modern town’s museum (متحف) was founded in 1961, and contains a collection of …

al-Rasafeh
الرصافة

The ruined Byzantine city of Sergiopolis, known today as al-Rasafeh (الرصافة), is one of the most spectacular historic sites in eastern Syria and bound to impress just about anyone who visits. Few tourists reach this remote place, which makes the journey all that much more rewarding: you might very well have the entire site to yourself. The remains are massive in scale and stunning in detail, …

Tel al-Salhiyeh/Dura Europos
تل الصالحية/دورا آوروبس

Tel al-Salhiyeh (تل الصالحية) is the modern name for the ancient city of Dura Europos (دورا آوروبس). Located in the Euphrates river valley between the modern town of al-Mayadin (الميادين‎) and the Iraqi border, the ruins of Dura Europos (دورا آوروبس) are perhaps the most impressive of all archaeological sites in the countryside of Deir al-Zur (دير الزور). While the remains are in a generally poor …

Athriya
اثريا

The small desert village of Athriya (اثريا) was once the site of the ancient Roman settlement of Seriana. Remains of its beautiful third century temple, relatively well-preserved, survive in this harsh desert landscape located about one hundred and thirty kilometers from Hama (حماة) and about equal distance from Homs (حمص). Once an important crossroads, and considerably more fertile than it is today, Athriya (اثريا) marked the point where the route between …

al-Nabi Houri
النبي هوري

Perhaps the most expansive of the Roman and Byzantine sites in the countryside of Aleppo (حلب) are the remains located at al-Nabi Houri (النبي هوري). Seldom visited due to its remote location, the site contains extensive remains of a once significant ancient city. These remains include an impressive Roman theater and tower tomb as well as two bridges that remain in use today. There are …

Meskaneh
مسكنة

Just outside the modern town of Meskaneh (مسكنة), on the shore of Lake Assad, are the remnants of the Bronze Age city of Emar and the subsequent Greek, Roman, Byzantine, and Arab settlements that occupied the site. Surviving remains include Byzantine fortifications and a 13th century brick minaret that offers commanding views over the area. The ancient settlement of Emar was mentioned in the tablets …